Tag Archives: Clophill

WWI – Ampthill Command Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, April 1918

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

April 1918 – two wounded, non-commissioned officers who have won gallantry medals are undergoing rehabilitation at the Ampthill Command Depot.

9409 Acting Company Sergeant Major Alfred STRINGER D.C.M. was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal twice in 1915 for his brave actions, and has also won the Russian Cross of St. George.

Alfred (20) joined the Army in January 1909 and was drafted in October 1914. He distinguished himself on May 16, 1915 at Festubert when, in the face of heavy German fire, Alfred Stringer led a small party who rushed a barricade that blocked the road and was hindering the British attack. Two days later when the Bedfords’ again went over the top Stringer, with ten men, reached a German trench in advance of the Battalion and held it against heavy odds until ordered to retire.

On September 30, 1915 Sergeant Stringer won a bar to the D.C.M.  at the Battle of Loos where he led a night bombing raid. The party struggled forwards in the face of fierce resistance and achieved their objective of taking the German trench, and repelled further vigorous counter attacks.

13784 Corporal Ernest W. JONES M.M. was awarded the Military Medal for his brave actions on August 10, 1917 during a British attack on the West Hoek Ridge in the Ypres Sector. Faced with a counter attack the Battalion withdrew and sustained casualties in Glencorse Wood which was being heavily shelled. Corporal Jones advanced into the wood and succeeded in bringing out some of the casualties.

[both of these men survived the war and were discharged from service in 1919].

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Bedfordshire Standard – April 12, 1918

News of the Canadians

The total cut for April amounted to 583,015 F.B.M. This was produced at the Canadian Mill at Ampthill Station and at the Scotch Mill at Clophill. The Canadian Mill lumbered timber from softwood hauled by motor transport from the Flitwick Plantation. The Clophill operation achieved 23 sawing days despite being handicapped by having to log fallen timber and haul it half a mile by horse-drawn wagon across the fields, and being impacted by the Portuguese labour trouble.

A total of 770,219 F.B.M. of sawn timber was consigned from Ampthill Station which is a little lower than in March.

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front

This month the war has claimed the lives of five men who trained at the Ampthill Camp.

Source: 

The Bedfordshire Standard. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.

Ampthill Parish Magazine
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Ancestry.com
The National Archives
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Red Cross
Ampthill’s Fallen – by John Hele (2014)

Report on the Activities of the 126 Company Canadian Forestry Corps. Ampthill 1917-18 (K.Fadden)
A Review of Activities with the 126th Company Canadian Forestry Corps while stationed at Ampthill, Bedfordshire, Eng. (Sgt H. Porter, 1918)

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

#IWMSTORIES

Next instalment to be published on 30 April 2018….

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


BUY: Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints

This 48 page book tells the story of how Tommy’s Footprints came about and notes the many people who have contributed and connected. There are just 150 individually numbered books. A unique gift.

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Proceeds will help to fund a book about the Ampthill Camp ~ profits to benefit the charity Combat Stress which was founded in 1919 to help WWI veterans deal with shell shock.

£6 (inc p&p). Please email hartleyhare135@gmail.com to order by PayPal or BACS transfer. The book is also available from Ampthill Town Council, The Hub and The Stationery Boutique in Ampthill while stocks last.

To remember that amazing day and the memories it went onto craft, here is a free copy of the book “Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints” – click to download.

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WWI – Bedfordshire Training Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, June 1916

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot from 1914-16. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

June 1916 – The nature of the Camp has started to shift. The Camp was established to train young, local men who heeded Kitchener’s call to volunteer. In early June more married Derby recruits have come in, and from further afield.

More than 1,000 trained men have been sent to reinforce the various battalions of the Bedfordshire Regiment in France, and other drafts are in readiness. On Tuesday, June 7th fifty picked men left the Camp and entrained amid enthusiasm for Liverpool to be attached to the Welsh Border Regiment. The Duke of Bedford addressed them prior to departure, and was loudly cheered.

On Saturdays the men have been rising early for long route marches, headed out by the band. The distance covered was about 15 miles. On Saturday 10th Millbrook and Ridgmont were visited while most of the villagers were still in bed. The march from Woburn through the beautiful Park to Eversholt was greatly appreciated.

Summer games and sports during recreation hours are in full swing, and the Park and Camp surroundings are at their best.

A memorial service was held on Tuesday 13th at the Ampthill Training Camp in memory of the late Lord Kitchener, the Chaplain (the Rev CR. Dickinson) conducting, assisted by the Rev. WD May. At 9am a 1,000 men of the Depot and paraded on the top plateau. Marching in slow time to the cadence of Chopin’s Funeral March, the battalion in columns of fours slowly descended the gorse clad slope to the Lower Parade where it formed into three sides of a square. The Regimental Band played the “Dead March” in “Saul,” and Lord Kitchener’s favourite hymn, “Abide with Me,” was sung during the service which was a most impressive one. At the close the Band played Tchaikovsky’s Funeral March.

On Thursday 22nd the Regimental Band, together with officers and a firing party, took part in the funeral of a Canadian soldier who arrived from the trenches in France at Woburn Abbey Hospital on the morning of Saturday week, and who succumbed to his wounds on Monday.

On Monday 26th fifty men were transferred from the Camp to join the South Wales Borderers.

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June 2, 1916

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June 9, 1916

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June 16, 1916

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June 23, 1916

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front

June 25 – the 2nd Bedfords carried out a raid on the Enemy’s lines. Ampthill recruits were among the Party. All fifty-one returned safely, capturing one prisoner (wounded). The casualties were: – 6 wounded. 1 shell blindness. 1 soldier accidentally wounded by barbed wire – more.

The Revd. C. L. Matthews, the Rector of Clophill, has written from France where he is serving as a chaplain:

“Funerals are always sad and solemn, but I think the funeral of a man who has given his life for his country is more solemn than any other. The cemeteries are getting very full, some of them, but every grave is carefully marked, and the place is tended with every care. Each grave is marked, first of all by a bottle, containing a paper with the man’s name, number, and regiment, and later on by a plain wooden cross with a metal inscription bearing full particulars.”

Source: Barton Parish Magazine, 18 June 1916 (as republished by Bedsathome blog)

Visit the Bedfordshire Regiment website to read the war diary of each Battalion.

Source:

The Bedfordshire Standard. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Bedfordshire Regiment

Next installment to be published on 15 August 2016….
Text copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


BUY: Ampthill Camp WWI Centenary Postcard

This special postcard commemorates the centenary of the WWI Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16). Limited edition: 500

Proceeds will help to fund a book about the Ampthill Camp ~ profits to benefit the charity Combat Stress which was founded in 1919 to help WWI veterans deal with shell shock.

£2 (inc p&p). Please email hartleyhare135@gmail.com to order by PayPal or BACS transfer.

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