Tag Archives: St. Andrew’s Church

WWI – Ampthill Command Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, November 1918

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

November 1918 – the Armistice was signed at 5 o’clock on Monday, November 11th where after the news rippled through Bedfordshire that firing would cease on all fronts at 11am.

In Bedford, immediately afterwards flags were flying all over the town, the church bells rang merry peals, and schools and most of the factories closed down. Soldiers were heartily cheered in the streets and jubilant crowds marched through the principal thoroughfares. The welcome news rippled throughout the County and there were many relieved and joyous scenes – read more.

1918.11.15 BT Armistice

Bedfordshire Times – November 15, 1918

 

How Ampthill received the news

News of the signing of the Armistice reached Ampthill about 10.20 a.m. on Monday, and instantly the flags of bygone days made their appearance one by one, until the town presented a festive appearance. About the largest flag in town was a huge one of the British colours, which hung outside the White Hart Hotel. Workshops and places of business closed and gave their attendants a holiday, and others took it. Those who could not have a flag had bows and enterprising shopkeepers did a good trade. The soldiers from the Camp had leave, and many of them crowded into the centre of the town, singing patriotic songs and making merry. A brewery dray, making its way from Bedford Street, met with an enthusiastic reception from the soldiers, who started to tug at the barrels of beer. The drayman was forced to return for shelter to the brewery premises. The scholars paraded the streets waving flags, singing songs and making an immense salute of noise. The flag on the church tower was hoisted, and the bells pealed out one of the most welcome peals ever heard in Ampthill.

The good old town clock in the market place, which had been silent for some years, took upon itself to send out its familiar chimes at 11 o’clock, causing the ears of the towns people to tingle at the well-remembered sound which had been lacking so long.
At the Parish Church a united public thanksgiving was held at which all classes and conditions were represented, and the Rector led the service. A solemn Te Deum was sung by a large congregation including Lady Ampthill and the Hon. Miss Russell and special thanksgiving hymns and Psalms were sung. Later on the school boys paraded for hours, fondly thumping kettles, pans and drums, and carrying flags, singing patriotic songs. In fact there never was such a commotion in the town, and such a feeling of thankfulness. There were mixed feelings of joy and sorrow in many hearts, especially those who had lost loved ones, but at the same time one and all were thanking that further sacrifice of life was now not necessary. Up to late hours the festive crowd occupied the market place, and the streets were alive with people. Several windows threw out the almost forgotten light.

Ampthill Command Depot

On Tuesday a party of the Royal Engineers from Haynes Park on horseback, paraded the town making merriment. In the evening the drum and fife band of the Command Depot, assisted by a number of men from the Depot, held a torchlight tattoo through the town, and were loudly cheered wherever they went. All the main streets were paraded, whilst the band played lively airs and the torches threw a lurid glare over the whole scene. In conclusion the band, halted in the Market-place and played “He’s a jolly good fellow,” followed by “Rule Britannia” and, as a finale, “God save the King.”

On Sunday, 17th a special thanksgiving service for the victory of the Allies was held at St.Andrew’s Church, when a large congregation was present. Ampthill Urban and District Council, the V.A.D and the uniformed organisations were well-represented. The Rector, Rev Walter D. May, took the service. Afterwards the various bodies formed up outside the church, and marched off to their respective headquarters.

A month of welcome relief

The Ampthill & Urban District Council’s decision to have 30 lamps lit in the town was speedily carried into effect. The dark paint has been removed, and the town presents a cheerful appearance.

The Band of the Bedford Depot, from Kempston Barracks, arrived in Ampthill on the afternoon of  Friday 15th, in motor lorries. It is 36 strong, under Bandmaster BAXTER, and seems to be composed chiefly of lads under military age. They were stationed at “Foulislea” in Church Street, and appear to be quite comfortable in their new quarters. The Band were inspected by Colonel His Grace the Duke of Bedford, K.G., A.D.C.,

A farewell tea, followed by a musical evening, was given to about 30 work men and staff of the Food Production Department, No. 2 Unit, Ampthill by the Flitt Cycle Company, at the King’s Arms Hotel. The men spent a most enjoyable time, and the military section were sorry to have to return to barracks, owing the scheme closing  down for the winter. No. 2 Unit has ploughed, cultivated or cut approximately 3,600 acres of land. This is really good considering the men were quite inexperienced in that particular work.

The Rev. A. M. RICHIE M.A., of Leicester, took both services at the Union Chapel, on Sunday. He has seen active service on the Western Front with the Y.M.C.A.

There was a good supply of cattle at the Ampthill Emergency Market  on Tuesday 19th. Forty beast and 200 sheep were surplus, and were sent away for distribution to other centres.

That evening the Ampthill Boy Scouts arranged a concert in the Church Room. Mr A. H. Wingfield was in the chair, and the room was crowded out. Mrs Stearn and Miss Collins were the accompanists, and much of the success is due to them. The Troop Funds should benefit by about £9 as a result.

News of Ampthill Boys

Private George DENNIS (Rifle Brigade), Private Edward SINEY (Machine Gun Corps), Private A. CARDINAL (Army Service Corps), Private Charles IZZARD (3rd Buffs) and Lieutenant Thomas Vaughan (Royal Scots Fusiliers) have been home on leave. Private Arthur MOORE (16th Middlesex) is also home on leave recovering from a neck wound.

Lieutenant Alfred WALDRON (Royal Engineers Signals) is now in France and has been laid up with an attack of influenza. Private Robert SHUTLER (Army Veterinary Corps) has been discharged from the Army, and is now home again. He has been looking after wounded horses in France.

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front

The final month of this torrid war has claimed the lives of 7 men who trained at the Ampthill Camp.

Source: 

The Bedfordshire Standard; Bedfordshire Times. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.

Ampthill Parish Magazine
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Ancestry.com
The National Archives
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Red Cross
Ampthill’s Fallen – by John Hele (2014)

 

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

#IWMSTORIES

Next instalment to be published on 31 December 2018….

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.

The Armistice – Ampthill, 1918

Monday, 11th November – the Armistice was signed at 5 o’clock where after the news rippled through Bedfordshire that firing would cease on all fronts at 11am.

In Bedford, immediately afterwards flags were flying all over the town, the church bells rang merry peals, and schools and most of the factories closed down. Soldiers were heartily cheered in the streets and jubilant crowds marched through the principal thoroughfares. The welcome news rippled throughout the County and there were many relieved and joyous scenes – read more.

How Ampthill received the news

News of the signing of the Armistice reached Ampthill about 10.20 a.m. on Monday, and instantly the flags of bygone days made their appearance one by one, until the town presented a festive appearance. About the largest flag in town was a huge one of the British colours, which hung outside the White Hart Hotel. Workshops and places of business closed and gave their attendants a holiday, and others took it. Those who could not have a flag had bows and enterprising shopkeepers did a good trade. The soldiers from the Camp had leave, and many of them crowded into the centre of the town, singing patriotic songs and making merry. A brewery dray, making its way from Bedford Street, met with an enthusiastic reception from the soldiers, who started to tug at the barrels of beer. The drayman was forced to return for shelter to the brewery premises. The scholars paraded the streets waving flags, singing songs and making an immense salute of noise. The flag on the church tower was hoisted, and the bells pealed out one of the most welcome peals ever heard in Ampthill.

The good old town clock in the market place, which had been silent for some years, took upon itself to send out its familiar chimes at 11 o’clock, causing the ears of the towns people to tingle at the well-remembered sound which had been lacking so long.

At the Parish Church a united public thanksgiving was held at which all classes and conditions were represented, and the Rector led the service. A solemn Te Deum was sung by a large congregation including Lady Ampthill and the Hon. Miss Russell and special thanksgiving hymns and Psalms were sung. Later on the school boys paraded for hours, fondly thumping kettles, pans and drums, and carrying flags, singing patriotic songs. In fact there never was such a commotion in the town, and such a feeling of thankfulness. There were mixed feelings of joy and sorrow in many hearts, especially those who had lost loved ones, but at the same time one and all were thanking that further sacrifice of life was now not necessary. Up to late hours the festive crowd occupied the market place, and the streets were alive with people. Several windows threw out the almost forgotten light.

On Tuesday a party of the Royal Engineers from Haynes Park on horseback, paraded the town making merriment. In the evening the drum and fife band of the Command Depot, assisted by a number of men from the Depot, held a torchlight tattoo through the town, and were loudly cheered wherever they went. All the main streets were paraded, whilst the band played lively airs and the torches threw a lurid glare over the whole scene. In conclusion the band, halted in the Market-place and played “He’s a jolly good fellow,” followed by “Rule Britannia” and, as a finale, “God save the King.”

On Sunday, 17th a special thanksgiving service for the victory of the Allies was held at St.Andrew’s Church, when a large congregation was present. Ampthill Urban and District Council, the V.A.D and the uniformed organisations were well-represented. The Rector, Rev Walter D. May, took the service. Afterwards the various bodies formed up outside the church, and marched off to their respective headquarters.

Source: The Bedfordshire Standard, 15th November 1918

#IWMSTORIES

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.

EXT038_18 Ampthill Armistice 1x3m PRESS.pdf

 

WWI – Ampthill – the Camp Diary, September 1914

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

September – a list of  His Majesty’s Forces in which members of the St. Andrew’s congregation and other from Ampthill are serving, has been placed in the Church Porch.

As at September 5th the Ampthill & District News believe the following to be the names:

Regulars                                           Yeomanry                                   Terriorials
Arthur ANSELL                                Edward LETTS                            Walter ANSELL
Charles BUNKER                              Bruce TUFFNELL                        Harry ATHEWS
Frank COX                                                                                                 Tom BURRIDGE
Christopher COX                                                                                      Ernest BURGE
Edward DAVIS                                                                                          Reginald COLES
Frederick DILLINGHAM                                                                         Herbert COLE
Ernest HARLOW                                                                                       Arthur GARDNER
LAMBERT                                                                                                   Harry KING
McCARTY                                                                                                    John LOWE
MARTIN                                                                                                      Jack ROBINSON
Charles PALMER                                                                                       James RANDALL
Arthur PRESSLAND                                                                                  George SHARP
Percy STANBRIDGE                                                                                  Reginald SHOTBOLT
Sidney THOROUGOOD                                                                             Jack SUGARS
Robert SHUTLER
Alfred WALDREN
Ernest WALTON
Horace WHITE
Cecil WHITEMAN
Ernest WOODLAND

 

Should anyone wish to add to the list will they please write the name of the Battleship or Regiment, together with the name of the sailor or soldier on a slip of paper and place it the box in the porch, marked “For Intercessions.” (Ampthill Parish News)

Source: 

The Bedfordshire Standard; Ampthill & District News. The original broadsheets are part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.

Ampthill Parish Magazine
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Ancestry.com
The National Archives
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Home Rule for Ampthill – Andrew Underwood (1974)

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

#IWMSTORIES

 

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


Ampthill Armistice100

As part of Ampthill Armistice100 join us on 12th or 13th October for the WWI Living History Encampment in Ampthill Great Park.

 

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Click here to download a copy of the Ampthill Armistice100 programme.

Please email Stephen Hartley if you would like to know more about Ampthill Armistice100 or volunteer.
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WWI – Ampthill Command Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, February 1918

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

February 1918 – On Tuesday, 12th the Church Room hosted a concert to help with recruiting volunteers to the Ampthill Detachment of the 1st Bedfordshire Volunteer Regiment. Lieutenant F. W. Bradshaw (O.C. Ampthill Detachment) and Volunteers in uniform were in attendance.

The main event was the ‘Olympics’ Concert Party from the Ampthill Command Depot, with Miss Belle Cameron of the ‘Arcadians Company’ also contributing with song.

During the interval Captain D. Scott (Adjutant, 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Volunteer Regiment) outlined the scheme and Captain H. Spensley O.C. ‘C’ Company appealed for volunteers and explained how necessary it was to get the Volunteer Force up to strength in case of an invasion.

A collection was taken in aid of the Red Cross funds, which raised a goodly sum.

In the Ampthill Parish Magazine the Reverend W.D. May has gladly written of the presence of a good many members of the Urban Council attending, as well as officer and men of the Volunteer Training Corps, and those at the Command Depot.

1918.2.15 BS
Bedfordshire Standard – February 15, 1918

 

 

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front

February has been a quiet month for Ampthill Park recruits who are serving on the Western Front.

Source: 

The Bedfordshire Standard. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.

Ampthill Parish Magazine
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Ancestry.com
The National Archives
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Red Cross
Ampthill’s Fallen – by John Hele (2014)

Report on the Activities of the 126 Company Canadian Forestry Corps. Ampthill 1917-18 (K.Fadden)
A Review of Activities with the 126th Company Canadian Forestry Corps while stationed at Ampthill, Bedfordshire, Eng. (Sgt H. Porter, 1918)

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

#IWMSTORIES

Next instalment to be published on 31 March 2018….

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


BUY: Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints

This 48 page book tells the story of how Tommy’s Footprints came about and notes the many people who have contributed and connected. There are just 150 individually numbered books. A unique gift.

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Proceeds will help to fund a book about the Ampthill Camp ~ profits to benefit the charity Combat Stress which was founded in 1919 to help WWI veterans deal with shell shock.

£6 (inc p&p). Please email hartleyhare135@gmail.com to order by PayPal or BACS transfer. The book is also available from Ampthill Town Council, The Hub and The Stationery Boutique in Ampthill while stocks last.

To remember that amazing day and the memories it went onto craft, here is a free copy of the book “Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints” – click to download.

 

WWI – Ampthill Command Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, January 1918

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

January 1918 – The three Voluntary Aid Detachment (V.A.D.) facilities in Ampthill, volunteer V.A.D. nurses and the Slipper Working Party play an important role in supporting the allied troops. Major Frank Stevens, in his capacity as County Director of Bedfordshire, has relayed an appeal for more V.A.D. helpers to come forth and offer personal service. Applications for either Nursing or General V.A.D. Service , should be addressed to the Chairman, V.A.D. Department, Devonshire House, Piccadilly, London, W.1.

1918.1.11 BS

Bedfordshire Standard – January 11, 1918

 

St. Andrew’s Church continues to be well-attended each Sunday evening by officers and men of the Volunteer Training Corps, the Canadian Forestry Corps, and the Ampthill Command Depot.

News of the Canadians
On January 31st His Grace, the Duke of Bedford, attended the Canadians to open the splendid Y.M.C.A Hut which they have built at the Camp. The fittings in the Hut have been tastefully crafted from off-cuts of local pine.

1918.3 APN

Ampthill Parish News (1918)

YMCA

126th Canadian Forestry Corps Y.M.C.A (1918)

 

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front

There is news this month that two Ampthill Camp recruits have been killed at the Front.

Source: 

The Bedfordshire Standard. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.

Ampthill Parish Magazine
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Ancestry.com
The National Archives
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog
Red Cross
Ampthill’s Fallen – by John Hele (2014)

Report on the Activities of the 126 Company Canadian Forestry Corps. Ampthill 1917-18 (K.Fadden)
A Review of Activities with the 126th Company Canadian Forestry Corps while stationed at Ampthill, Bedfordshire, Eng. (Sgt H. Porter, 1918)

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

#IWMSTORIES

Next instalment to be published on 28 February 2018….

Text and images copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


BUY: Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints

This 48 page book tells the story of how Tommy’s Footprints came about and notes the many people who have contributed and connected. There are just 150 individually numbered books. A unique gift.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Proceeds will help to fund a book about the Ampthill Camp ~ profits to benefit the charity Combat Stress which was founded in 1919 to help WWI veterans deal with shell shock.

£6 (inc p&p). Please email hartleyhare135@gmail.com to order by PayPal or BACS transfer. The book is also available from Ampthill Town Council, The Hub and The Stationery Boutique in Ampthill while stocks last.

To remember that amazing day and the memories it went onto craft, here is a free copy of the book “Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints” – click to download.

 

WWI – Ampthill Command Depot in Ampthill Park – the Camp Diary, December 1916

The ‘Camp Diary’ provides an insight into the Bedfordshire Training Depot (1914-16) and No.9 Command Depot (1916-1919) that followed. Based on newspaper reports of the time.

December 1916 – it is barely two months since the Command Depot was established. In that short space of time occupancy has rapidly risen to about 1,000 convalescent soldiers. More buildings are being put up.

A number of men at the Depot have been awards medals for their bravery and gallant actions at the Front:

  • Sergeant O.G. Avis of the 1/4th Battalion Suffolk Regiment – the Distinguished Conduct Medal for taking up a platoon as support under heavy fire at Loos in February 1916
  • 7942 Lance-Corporal Harry Steele of the 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment – the Military Medal for gallant actions as a stretcher-bearer during a fight for a crater at Rocklincourt in June.
  • 24954 Private Abraham M. Brunning of the 7th Battalion Suffolk Regiment – the Military Medal for working 36 hours under heavy fire at The Somme as a stretcher-bearer bringing in the wounded.
abraham-brunning-abt-1914

Pte Abraham Brunning (c1914) – used with kind permission

These three men were subsequently joined the ‘Class P Reserve‘ because their services were deemed to be ‘temporarily of more value to the country in civil life rather than in the Army.’ The three men survived the Great War.

The Ampthill Volunteer Training Corps has increased to nearly 70. Their headquarters in town are not large enough for drill, and so the largest Camp hut, known as “Olympia,” has been placed at Corps’ disposal for training on certain nights.

As we approach Christmas a Memorial Service has been held at St. Andrew’s Church where prayers were offered for those fighting for King and Country, and on behalf of those mourning the loss of loved relatives.

1916-12-01-bs-acd

1916-12-22-bs-acd-awards

December 22, 1916

1916-12-22-bs

December 22, 1916

1916-12-15-ncos

December 15, 1916

News of Ampthill Park recruits at the Front 

Mrs C.Smith (of Preston, Hitchin) has received a Christmas postcard from her son Leonard [18677 Private L.C. Smith] who left the Camp in October 1915 to serve with the Bedfords’ at the Front.

News has been received about Arthur Day (of Lilley) who trained at the Ampthill Camp and has been at the Front since July. On November 2nd Private Day was wounded in the back. He has been cleared back to Newcastle-on-Tyne War Hospital and is recuperating.

There is also news about 23246 Private Henry Diggins (of Maulden). Sadly, Private Diggins was killed by a shell. The family await official confirmation.

1916-12-01-bs-arthur-day

December 1, 1916

1916-12-01-bs-harry-diggins

December 15, 1916

16-12-22-bs-band

December 22, 1916

  • Casualties 

20585 Sergeant Charles CHANDLER (30) of Hertford Killed in Action on December, 1
18529 Private Edmund ALLEN of Alconbury Weston Died of Wounds on December, 12
G60150 Private John WILMOT of Welwyn Died of Wounds on December, 19
18860 Private Henry E. CLARKE (33) of Kensworth Died at Home on December, 20

 

Source:

The Bedfordshire Standard. The original broadsheet is part of the Bedfordshire & Luton Archive.
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
RBL Roll of Honour
Bedsatwar blog
Bedsathome blog

Www.bedfordshireregiment.co.uk

Next installment to be published on 31 January 2017….
Text copyright S.Hartley (2015-)

Care is taken to ensure accuracy – please accept my apologies if the content contains any errors.


BUY: Stencilling Tommy’s Footprints

This 48 page book tells the story of how Tommy’s Footprints came about and notes the many people who have contributed and connected. There are just 150 individually numbered books. A unique Christmas gift.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Proceeds will help to fund a book about the Ampthill Camp ~ profits to benefit the charity Combat Stress which was founded in 1919 to help WWI veterans deal with shell shock.

£6 (inc p&p). Please email hartleyhare135@gmail.com to order by PayPal or BACS transfer. The book is also available from Ampthill Town Council, The Hub and The Stationery Boutique in Ampthill while stocks last.

 

WWI – Bedfordshire Training Depot in Ampthill Park – the memorial plate in Ampthill Methodist Church

There are four WWI memorials in Ampthill:

  • In Ampthill Park the Duke of Bedford Memorial Cross remembers the 2,235 local volunteers who trained in Ampthill Park (1914-16) and the 707 who were killed;
  • At the end of the Alameda the Cenotaph remembers the 65 Ampthill men who were killed;
  • In St.Andrew’s Church Yard a Memorial Cross remembers the parishioners who were killed;
  • Inside Ampthill Methodist Church a large, brass wall plate remembers the men connected with the Church and Sunday School who were killed.

On Monday 4, August 2014 to commemorate the outbreak of WWI I photographed three of the memorials.

P1080325

Duke of Bedford Memorial Cross, Ampthill Park

P1080313

Cenotaph, The Alameda

 

P1080328

Memorial Cross, St.Andrew’s Church

On 24, February 2016 Ampthill Methodist Church kindly allowed me to photograph the fourth memorial – a large brass plate Inside the Nave on the East wall.The Memorial Plate is inlaid with enamel and measures about a yard square. It was unveiled on 5, December 1920.

2016-02-24 17.24.26

Memorial Wall Plate, Ampthill Methodist Church

Six of the men are brothers of the Ansell, Cox and Money families. Christopher and Frank Cox were killed a few days apart in 1916 at the Battle of the Somme. John Hele’s book ‘Ampthill’s Fallen‘ tells the fate of all twenty-two men. Five of the men are also remembered on the Duke of Bedford War Memorial in Ampthill Park where they trained (1914-16). The five men are:

  • Arthur Gillett
  • Thomas Money
  • George Money
  • Richard William Putman
  • George Thompson

 

Sources
Ampthill’s Fallen (John Hele, 2014)

Content & photographs copyright Stephen Hartley (2015-)